Pharma’s Digital Lens

As I meet more people and discuss their digital ideas and strategy, I think Pharma looks at digital through the wrong lens. The question I am often asked is: “This is my business model, how can tech help?” I think trying to answer the question framed that way cannot lead to the write answers. It is simply too product-centric. It is all about me, my Rx and my brand.

Instead if the question was to be re-framed thus: “I get a sense that it’s not business as usual. The fundamentals are changing. What should I do?”, I think business leaders could open their marketing teams to considering many more possibilities than they currently do. This would be true customer-centricity since the concern here is about how to serve the customer better in a changing environment, rather than worrying about I, me and myself.

Trying to make teams think of how to use technology in the existing business model and in the current framework can be misleading. The shift is fundamental. Do business leaders think this is understood and internalized well by everyone?

Maybe the real problem is that the shift is slow and imperceptible. Fundamental shifts creep upon us and are imperceptible until we are engulfed by it. For eg: the shift to a rental economy (I rent a car instead of owning one, I rent a home away from home, instead of staying in an expensive hotel) wasn’t felt and perceived by everyone. Yet, today, Uber and AirBnB are a way of life. Similarly, today, we can’t imagine life without touchscreens, but Nokia was King not so long ago. There are many more such examples of how imperceptible fundamental shifts have damaged the businesses of many a strong incumbent.

So if pharma marketing teams feel that fundamentals aren’t changing in the way customers behave or the way business is conducted, then probably forcing them to adopt digital won’t work. It explains why so many say “we do a lot of digital”. You don’t “do” digital. You “go” digital i.e. transform. You “do” digital if you are either forced to do it, or you don’t understand or agree with it. If you don’t feel the shift, then you probably don’t need digital. So, don’t do it.

However, if you’re worried about missing out, or that its not right to avoid digital, then maybe you feel the change in your gut, but you aren’t too sure. So look more closely. Do you know your customers really well? Or do you think you do? Are they still the same? Or are there signs that things have changed?

Once you understand and agree that the shift is indeed happening then begin to re-examine the basis of your current business model and framework. Look for areas which don’t appeal to your customers and see if tech tools can help you regain the engagement of your valuable customers.

That’s the essence of transformation:

1. Ask if you notice shifts in macro factors such as environment, customer behaviour and business basics.

2. Update your understanding of each factor.

3. Identify areas in your model/framework that are outdated.

4. Can tech help to update?

This would be the right lens through which pharma looks at digital.

Don’t make it feel like it’s marketing

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Changes in pharma marketing will be profound with the advent of technology. Digital marketing will allow pharma marketers to engage the customer in very meaningful ways which were not always possible through the work of sales reps.

While sales reps are important in the scheme of things, they are but one channel. In-clinic time with doctors is massively decreasing today and that is because neither the channel (rep) nor the content can engage the doctor and hold his attention.

Through digital it is possible for pharma to know more about their customers than they ever have in the past.

This additional knowledge is thought to hold the key to understanding the customers needs and wants. Through this pharma can offer better services to them, thereby building loyalty along the way.

None of these tenets are new. This is what marketing is about. However, most of it has got lost along the way as pharma-doctor engagement became tactical and transactional; from information sharing and knowledge building to ultimately benefit the patient.

Overseas – especially in the US, pharma is more advanced in the use of digital technology considering that the market is matured to these advances. In India, pharma is scraping the tip and tentatively exploring these options. We have started to see pharma companies create websites, run email contact campaigns, conduct online CMEs and webcast them, create apps for their brands as well as explore the creation of discussion forums and social pages.

While all these are great initiatives, not integrating them will not allow doctors to understand the context of each initiative. Therefore, each digital piece is likely to be viewed as a random one. If doctors are unable to link all its initiatives, the company also risks their customers not consuming/linking key pieces of information. This can make the strategy look incomplete and leave customers with a sub-optimal experience.

Is Digital effective?

This can be viewed in two different ways. The first way is to view digital marketing as another channel of marketing. This makes it integral to the entire marketing strategy and increases its overall effectiveness. This makes it almost impossible to evaluate the effectiveness of individual pieces of the strategy and say that it was digital intervention alone that drove the success.

The second way is to re-assess the things we measure to define success. Generally marketing campaigns measure their success against increased prescriptions for their brands, more sales, higher market share etc. Yet as David Ogilvy said, “I know half of my advertising budget works; I only don’t know which half”.

The good part though is, digital can track and stream data like no other channel ever could.

We know how many people opened emails, how much of the email they read, clicked on a link, watched a video, visited a website, how long they stayed, what content they read and where they went from that website. These are the sort of metrics that digital marketing can throw up and these are the ones that should be measured to determine success or determine the specific lift that digital intervention provided to the marketing campaign.

The best part of digital is that when done right over a period, it becomes predictive.

Now very few other marketing tactics can tell a marketer in advance what their customer is thinking of doing. This predictability can be great differentiation and a source of competitive advantage as Google, Amazon, Facebook, Netflix and your local bank have shown.

Benefits of digital marketing

The time-tested mantra for efficient selling has always been “the right message to the right customer at the right frequency”. Digital adds “through the right channel” to it.

The new channels that tech allows access to help marketers to reach their customers at the place and at the time of their choice. Specific to pharma, doctors would always be inaccessible except for the stipulated days and hours at which they chose to meet sales reps.

Today pharma can reach doctors at a place of their choice, at the time of their choosing and through a channel that they most love. It could be a video, an infographic, a webcasted seminar, an email or in some cases a virtual rep. The choice therefore empowers the customer to seek info when he deems fit rather than having it thrust at him.

Of course, this isn’t as easy as is made out to be. To ensure that the doctor ‘consumes’ their content, pharma must make it very relevant and interesting. To make it relevant, they need to know as much about the doctor as possible.

The fundamental shifts in marketing are that it becomes all about the doctor/patient (customer-centric) rather than product-centric; it becomes data-driven (the more pharma knows about the doctor, the better they can serve him) and it focuses on experience (if the doctor finds pharma to be too nosy or the content uninteresting, he simply dumps them). This moves pharma marketing from the ABC – awareness (of the brand), (prescription of the) brand and CRM – to the CDE – customer, data and experience.

How relevant is digital marketing?

Currently, Pharma marketing is all about the ABC – awareness (of the brand), (prescription of the) brand and CRM. This is exactly why pharma hasn’t truly grasped the essence of digital marketing. Digital marketing moves it to the CDE – customer, data and experience. In simple words, this means that marketers must focus less on their product and focus completely on the customer.

In the digital economy there are 3 rules:

  1. Your business is not to sell your product. It is to engage your customer
  2. Your differentiation is not how good your product is. It is how well you know your customer (data)
  3. Your competitive advantage is not the size of sales force, or the number of SKUs you sell. It is the experience that you create for your customer which determines how loyal they stay to you.

Products have stopped to differentiate. Experiences have begun to differentiate. Does this mean that product selling is not important? On the contrary, the CDE of digital marketing only strengthens product sales. Through digital channels, you can engage the customer better. And engaged customers don’t need to be sold to.

Is Pharma Coping?

Pharma was for a long time in denial and even today the odd digitally illiterate executive exists. However, most of the pharma has now moved to the digitally aware phase where the newly initiated are smitten with technology. This explains why there is so much buying/subscribing to tech products and large-scale digitization of internal processes. This is a very important stage of the transformation cycle, but in their excitement, they often forget that success rides on three pillars – people, business models and things. When companies focus on technology (things) they ignore the other two that are the more important pillars.

Pharma will cope soon. After all, it is exactly what it has always wanted to do – engage with customers, ensure relevance of marketing content and ensure spontaneous brand recall. With digital there is a difference – it won’t feel like it is marketing.

 

 

 

The Digital Economy

The first time I heard the term ‘digital economy’ in the medical context, it was from a reputed doctor who was a co-panelist and speaker at a company town hall event on digital marketing. It did not surprise me one bit that the doctor knew more about the digital economy than most of the pharma marketers gathered in the audience. But, it set me thinking.

The digital economy is the effect that advancements in technology have on the ways of doing business. Things change in the digital universe only in shape and form. The principles stay the same. It is probably why marketers think that everything is new. They have simply forgotten the old.

Customer engagement, not products or services

While in the analogous world the golden rules of marketing have gathered a thick layer of dust, the digital world is brutal. It is ruled by customers who are spoiled for choice. In this economy your business is no longer only about your products or services. Customers believe product quality and features to be hygiene factors that are to be taken for granted. They do not give brands that dupe them a second chance. Not only do they expect honest and transparent business, they pay a premium for brands and companies that engage them.

Rule 1: In the digital world, your business is to engage customers in the most meaningful ways.

Data, not money

It goes without saying that customers will never engage with brands that do not recognize them. In the words of Keith Weed – the CMO of Unilever, customers today are informed, presumptuous and impatient. If you do not know enough about your customers to engage them almost instantly, they will ‘bounce off’ your website. They presume that you are tracking them and that you know everything about them. And it makes them impatient if they think brands will make them waste time by getting to know them when all they want to do is satisfy their needs. This makes data the new currency – not money. Money is just incidental for customers to get what they need and they will choose to spend that money wisely. Brands or businesses that do not know them, will not get their money.

Rule 2: The digital economy is powered by data – not money.

Customer experience trumps all else

If customers expect you to know them well and are willing to engage only with those who do, there is a reason for it. Let’s say you Skyped with your friend one morning and she told you about a new book or a video game. It fascinated you. You never heard of it and you want to know everything about it. Instantly, you Google it and read up every review that you can lay your hands on. Once you have, you want to buy it. Amazon it is! All in the matter of a few minutes. And since you’re all happy, you want to watch a new flick on Netflix.

Now imagine if this scenario had played out 15-20 years ago. You would have had to go over to your friend’s place to have that conversation and then walk over to the lone book store, then off to the bank to withdraw some money and then back to the store to buy the book or game CD. And if you had the energy to watch a movie, then you would trudge off to the local single-screen cinema to try your luck with buying a movie ticket on the black market.

Rule 3: Customer experience is your competitive advantage

Digital has made everything so easy! In the new world, experience trumps everything else. Digital natives keep ‘in touch’ on social media, text their friends more than speak to them, transact online, cannot remember when they last went to a supermarket or to the bank and don’t know what it means to have to wait for a cab!

Its almost like the physical world doesn’t exist anymore.

Why would you think that doctors and patients are any different? Digital has (in most cases) done away with time and distance. One can talk to a doctor on call and not have to go to a clinic or hospital (unless in emergencies). Doctors can get all the information they need at the click of a button. They don’t depend on medical reps anymore for it. And that’s probably why they don’t value meeting them so much anymore.

This is not to say that medical reps have no jobs to do. Far from it! It means the nature of their jobs have gone back to being what they were originally meant to be. The time-tested yet now forgotten – serve the customer. Its time to brush the dust off those principles.

I didn’t say this – the doctor at the town hall did. Doctors get the digital economy. You can be dead sure that he and his colleagues aren’t waiting with bated breath for pharma to start participating. Its time we accepted that and played by the rules.

 

The Digital World – Be there or be square!

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to talk to a group of mid-level pharma marketers on what marketing means in a digital world and how the rules of the game have changed. I began by asking them what they thought was the basic purpose of a marketer. They responded in their own ways and after a bit of debate, we agreed on headlining it as “promoting my product”. Didn’t that sound too much like a product-oriented approach, I asked. Isn’t that exactly your problem as a pharma marketer? That there is a clutter of products? That the market is commoditized with over 60,000 brands? Heads nodded in agreement.

As the group warmed up to the chat, they threw up the challenges that they faced every day. Customers did not see value in sales reps calling on them, hence did not give them more call time in their clinics. They often complained to senior company executives who called on them, that pharma marketing was getting dull and boring and did not provide them with information that was helpful to treat their patients better. On their part, marketers faced the constant challenge of slow sales and sought to constantly improve product sales. They wondered if the panacea for all their problems was “digital”. Is digital the answer, was their eager question.

Of course not! Digital is not the solution to all the problems that the industry faces, but it surely is the way the world is moving, so why not catch up? If the pharma industry – that for long had held up the flag of innovation – was comfortable launching new and better products, why was it such a laggard in recognizing and adopting the advancements in technology?

Digital is simply about leveraging technology

It is often misunderstood that digital means reorienting the entire company and sometimes even the business model. This is not always required. Most pharma companies have very customer-facing business models. A majority of the industry makes a sincere effort to understand and serve customers. Going digital simply means understanding technology and how it can help the company serve its customers better. It’s more about the mind-set than anything else.

Shifting the mindset

If the dominant mindset in a company is “promote my products”, digital does play a role, but the purpose of digital adoption might be slightly different as compared to another company where the mindset is “engage or serve my customers”. If more and more customers have an increasing digital presence, does it make sense for the company to not be there? Like an old adage goes, “fish where the fish are!” If all the fish are downstream, looking for them to bite upstream might be stretching the optimism a bit, wouldn’t it? So, if your customers are looking for information online and using digital tools and platforms to update themselves, would it make sense for you to not be there? As they say in America, be there or be square.

Misplaced obsession with sales

A “promote my products” mindset betrays an obsession with product sales. While this is not necessarily bad, it misses a crucial point. You can sell only to those who engage with you. If the idea is to simply push your product all the time, it won’t necessarily work. However, if the customer is engaged and sees value in engaging with you, they are already sold to. Engaged customers don’t need to be sold to, they already love your company and your product. Sometimes, they are even willing to pay more for your product because they love it so much. While this may set off alarm bells in the howling winds of price control, the point is that engaged customers become agnostic to price. This means that you will succeed even if you have a premium-priced product. Provided you have engaged your customer base very well and consistently. Digital provides you with tools to do exactly that!

If today the only way you engage your customers is through your sales force, why then would you ignore or avoid more channels of reaching and engaging them? Instead of just the visual aids that reps carry, technology allows you to create content in multiple different ways (graphics – simple and in 3D, videos – short and long, using augmented and virtual reality and a lot more) that bring novelty and value to customer interactions. Platforms allow you to host all the wonderful content that you create and apps allow that content to be distributed in the most efficient manner to your customers – at a time and place of their choice. And the best part is that all of this augments the efforts of the sales force. Where you have one channel (the sales force) to engage your customer, technology allows you multiple channels. Hence, multi-channel marketing or MCM.

Marketing in a digital world

In an almost totally digital world, marketing is therefore about:

  1. Engaging your customers and not merely promoting your product.
  2. Providing to customers what they want to see and not what you want them to see
  3. Personalizing content – each individual (your customers are individuals too) has different likes and dislikes. Personalise by curating content. There is a ton of it already created, so don’t waste your time creating more (as much as you would like to think otherwise, your visual aid bores your customer. So show her what she wants to see or someone else will).
  4. “Pulling” customers. Pulled customers look for excuses to engage. They wait for more content, new products and are willing to pay more for it.

I asked the group to imagine a world where they could provide their customers a fast, personalized and frictionless experience. They had difficult imagining it, so I asked to think of the kind of experience that they had while searching for information, buying or selling something and completing banking transactions online. All at a time and place of their choice. That’s the kind of experience your customers seek in the digital world. It is your role to give them that experience. So, dear pharma marketers, be there, or be square!

Digital Darwinism

Digital Darwinism is when technology and society evolve faster than an organization can adapt. Digital Darwinism is a fate that threatens most organizations in almost every industry, but particularly those in the pharmaceutical industry in India.

Evolution of technology will make it tougher for pharma companies to differentiate, engage customers and compete, unless they master digital evolution.

Digital Evolution

 

 

Selling in a digital era

Recently I decided to buy a laptop. As I looked around for the right one, I realized how little I knew about hardware. Having always used a company provided one, it was one of the things I had never bothered to educate myself on. As I always do for most things that I know nothing about, I spoke to friends. From what they told me, I did a lot of research online. Armed with information of an ideal laptop, I decided to “look and feel”. I headed off to an electronics store and spent the better part of an hour ‘testing’ a few models with the help of the friendly salesman before I bought the one I wanted. Do most of us shop this way? Maybe!

As you see, in my ‘journey’ the human element came in just once – to seal the deal. With so much information available online, I had already made up my mind before I went into a store and bought what I wanted to. This was a case of laptops and dummies, but is this very different in the case of drugs and doctors?

In such an era, pharma companies invest a significant amount of money into hiring and maintaining large sales forces. This component is, in fact the largest part of a company’s selling expenses. This is driven by the decades-old belief that nothing compares to a salesman calling on a doctor to convince him of a company’s product. Yet, in reality, the idea that reps will soon be obsolete is constantly reinforced by reducing in-clinic time for them, as doctors see lesser and lesser value delivered. There is also the constant pressure on profit margins as companies negotiate a fluid regulatory environment. These factors are as true in India as they are overseas. What is yet to be determined is if ‘non-rep’ models are bust-cycle fads that will reverse in soon to follow boom-cycles?

My personal opinion is that in any selling process, a human element is never obsolete, but the effectiveness of that element is maximized when it is introduced at the most appropriate moment in the ‘customer journey’.

old to new model

It is quite well known that in the new era, 70% of the buying decision is made before the first contact with a supplier is made. By the time I walked into the electronics store, I knew which laptop I wanted to buy, its specifications, its size, color and add-ons. I walked into that store just to see how that laptop actually looked and to understand the deals that the store would offer on my purchase. The salesman at the store already had a ready and willing customer and his sale was efficient and quick even though I made a big show of looking and evaluating other options. The actual amount of time he spent on making the deal was not more than 15 minutes of that hour.

Such efficiency is needed in pharma sales as well since the rep model is currently under stringent evaluation. Companies seeking operational efficiency are critically analyzing all major costs and are looking for alternatives. In such a scenario, instead of considering a ‘no-rep’ model, companies should consider a ‘low-rep’ model. This means downsizing a bulging force to just the optimal number of people needed to quickly and efficiently close deals. An example is illustrated below:

customerjourney

As companies build websites, apps, videos and other digital content, is this a ‘customer journey’ that they have at the back of their minds? Are they willing to prime a customer as much as they can using their formidable online resources and connect a medical rep as the final point of contact to seal the deal? If this is how it can be done, how would the medical rep’s job evolve? What kind of training would such sales forces require?

Of course, this isn’t an easy process. Moving away from a decades-old mindset of building armies of medical reps isn’t going to be easy. And to be sure, such models will probably not be the best in every single situation. For example, a new product launch will require a different strategy compared to a more established brand. The fact of the matter is, evolving technology provides superior alternatives to creating value for customers without having to compromise traditional sales metrics.

I am pretty sure the salesman at the electronics store was half-relieved that I knew what I wanted when I walked in. It saved his time and allowed him to refocus his energy to other dummies who wanted laptops. Wouldn’t drug reps and doctors feel the same way?

 

 

 

Slaying the Digital beast

Digital technology is an amazing system whereby information (words and images) are stored in the form of code. This enables unimaginably vast amounts of information to be compressed on small storage devices that can be easily preserved and transported. Digitization – or converting information to code-  also quickens data transmission speeds. This technology has transformed how people communicate, learn, and work.

It is quite understandable how folks confuse between what is digital and what is not. Largely that’s because they just use the term digital and do not suffix it with either ‘marketing’ or ‘technology’. While ‘digital marketing’ is a new buzzword at least in pharma, ‘digital technology’ is not. Digital technology has been used in phones (landlines) since the 1980s, when the newer models (portable phones versus the old black telephones) were introduced. In the 1990s, digital technology enabled satellite television to enter Indian homes with a variety of 24X7 content instead of the boring, fixed time single channel DD. In the wider context, digital technology transformed information (as libraries digitized books), the airline industry (as more sophisticated air monitoring systems came into vogue).

Once we understand what ‘digital’ and ‘digitalization’ means, it is easier to understand that this is the process and everything else is the channel. Social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIN have used digital technology to create platforms for engagement over the internet. The amazing part of these social media outlets are that unlike traditional media such as newspapers and TV news channels, online sites do not create any content of their own. They merely provide platforms where it is easy for the layman to create his/her own content and engage with like-minded people from around the world. This is called user-generated content where users actually generate the content instead of the website. A more formal example is Wikipedia.

While social media is about humans interacting with machines (computers, mobile phones etc), the Internet of Things (IoT) uses digital technology to make machines interact with machines and humans. This is how a device on your hand can tell the app in your phone how much you walked or ran this morning. Or your laptop at office can switch on the coffee maker at home so that hot coffee awaits you as you drive in. Or the dashboard of your car can inform your doctor if you had a hypoglycemic attack and an accident. This is fascinating stuff and you can imagine how endless the possibilities with digital technology are. IN our business of selling medicines, the applications can be massive and can change the way disease is managed and treated.

Q: Is digital like a photocopier that is used by all the functions in a company or is it something only for the marketing and sales functions?

“Digital” – if it refers to technology – is used by almost everyone in a company. If you’re using a laptop or a phone or a scanner, then you’re using digital technology. However, if this refers to using digital channels to market your product or an activity to support your brand, then this is largely the domain of the marketing and sales team. The success of a digital campaign, in my opinion, is when it steps out of the domain of a marketer. Of course, the concept and execution still stays with them, but if colleagues in office don’t engage with the activity, or if the online campaign is too doctor-focused, then we aren’t leveraging the power and the reach of the medium.

I think it is also very important to understand that digital never drives strategy. It is always the brand strategy which decides the channel. Does a leave-behind piece or a visual aid decide the strategy of a brand? Of course not. They are just tools that a marketer uses to achieve an overarching brand objective (like create higher brand awareness amongst a specialty of doctors). It is the strategy of the brand that decides on which tools you want to use. It’s the same with digital – these are just channels or tools that one uses as one deems fit. I have always been amused when brand leads come to me and say “I have a Facebook strategy”. You can’t have a facebook strategy. You have a brand strategy. Using Facebook or not using it depends on that strategy.

Q : How can digital lead to better engagement with doctors and patients?

Digital technology allows innumerable options to engage with doctors and patients. As you would know customers engage most effectively with organizations or products that solve a pain point or what we call as an ‘unmet need’. One of the larger ones in health care for quite some time is ‘information asymmetry’ or the lack of availability of information that can be easily understood for patients or care-givers. This prevents them from understanding their choices and making informed decisions. Websites like iodine.com attempt to bridge that gap.

Some other pain points are when patients want to consult another doctor to take a second opinion. This is very different from ‘doctor shopping’. Again there are websites that allow such discussions. Today finding the right doctors, setting up appointments, using mobile/digital prescribing and having medicines home-delivered through online orders reduces costs (makes it easier, sometimes cheaper) for health care transactions.

All this is possible through the use of digital technology. Pharma may not probably play in all those spaces. Yet, in its core area, pharma is making major changes to its operating model to wrap it around the possibilities that digital tech creates. Globally, there is a move to use big data to glean sharper and more relevant insights into patient and doctor thinking and behavior. There is also a realization that the industry must move away from monologues or ‘pushing’ information to engaging in a conversation or creating a ‘pull’ for information. This engagement of course will be required across all the possible channels (omni-channel) and must occur almost in real-time. No customer will wait if he/she receives an auto-response saying “Thank you for your email, you will receive a response from us in 7 working days”. Those days are long gone!

Considering the constrained environment that the industry operates in, it is little wonder that pharma is taking so long to institutionalize these changes. However, stellar examples in digital engagement can be found from companies such as Pfizer, BI, AZ, J&J, GSK and some more. These convince me that the industry is surely headed in the right direction. In the future, I think we will see more tie-ups and collaborations to create better and user-friendly products. That will make health care democratized (of the patient, for the patient and by the patient) in the true sense.

Q : How well prepared are professionals in terms of skill levels to facilitate digital adoption by companies?

Not much at the moment. There is too much of entrenchment into the traditional style of operations. We see human capital being built up within organizations but it is too focused on execution at the moment. There is limited play of digital natives within executive teams where decision making lies. That’s probably why we rarely see brand managers or business heads evolving their plans to wrap around the massive opportunities that digital creates. There is no ‘new-orbit’ thinking at the moment and therefore we see pdfs of visual aids on iPads, aspirations to create mobile apps (with little understanding of what end that will achieve) and 2-hour long CMEs distributed over web streaming platforms, once or twice a year. This belies little or no understanding of either the medium or the consumer of such content. This is the typical “monologue” or “push” mode that pharma is so comfortable with.

One could argue that reverse mentoring can help move understanding up the chain, but like most things that try to defy gravity, such initiatives rarely gain altitude. I am waiting for the day when pharma hires a CEO from a tech company. Someone who is told, “We are in the health care (not pharma) space and we need your help to do better in the new age economy.” That will be the day.

Q : Any good examples of digital adoption by pharma – global and domestic?

There are quite a few examples that are isolated (brilliant iPad campaigns or SM engagement etc.) but I want to focus on a couple of them. One of them is the “Don’t turn your back on it” campaign by Abbvie. This is for lower back pain and it is phenomenal in its omni-channel presence and the way it is being executed. I do not know the result of it, but I am sure it is good. Another such campaign in India is the “Knowledge Genie” project that Abbott rolled out in India a few years ago.

There are definitely many more such examples, but the reason I picked out these two campaigns are because of their distinct uses and I think there are lessons here for us. The Abbvie campaign is a glocal one – designed and created by the Global team but executed by individual markets. This shows a great alignment of the ‘go-digital’ spirit through the entire breadth of the organization. This is a brand-oriented campaign.

The Abbott India campaign is different in the sense that this is a doctor engagement campaign and not a product/brand-oriented one. Both these are long-term engagements that require a tremendous amount of capabilities and alignment within the organization and therefore worthy of mention.

Q  How useful are platforms like Docplexus, Curofy and others to Clinicians? 

This is a tough one for me to answer considering that I am neither a clinician nor a part of these platforms. However, I think the need for such platforms exists in terms of a neutral discussion forum for doctors to exchange ideas and to network. Recently I saw another such platform which advertised its USP to be “pharma-independent”. Of course, this may be done to differentiate this platform from the others who engage pharma; but I see a lesson here.

If pharma not participating in such platforms is considered a boon, then there is something seriously wrong. The industry which has to be an enabler of such initiatives is considered unwanted. It’s a shame since it signifies how wrong we have gone with our understanding of our customers’ needs and wants.

Who are the others new players in healthcare – what do companies Practo signify for healthcare?

There are many new players and it excites me tremendously. When Sergey Brin famously said that health care is ‘over-regulated’ he expressed the angst of millions of people amongst who are hundreds of innovators. I was afraid that these words from the co-founder of Google would scare off many of them. Fortunately, it hasn’t.

I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to coach a few startups in India and the energy, enthusiasm and never-say-die attitude that these youngsters have is just phenomenal. It is such a refreshing change from my day job.

“Startups” – as the new entrants in the space are referred to – are run by very smart youngsters who have identified “white spaces” in the health care arena. White space is jargon for an area in the sector that has a potential (and lucrative) customer pool but nobody to service them. To illustrate that, take the example of knowing the right doctors to meet when there is an urgent medical need. While this was a very obvious unmet need, the established players (hospitals, doctor organizations or pharma) did nothing for years. It took one determined youngster to begin a company that specialized in that area and then built around that core proposition.

This is what companies like Practo signify for healthcare. These companies have the potential to disrupt the health care space. They can create efficiencies in processes that established players have little incentive to reform. If and when they do that, it won’t be very pretty for the incumbents. We are seeing start ups all across the value stream – from data analytics to R&D, clinical trials, manufacturing straight up to managing the end-user experience. Almost every area in health care is looking at potential disruption. How soon will it happen? Only time will tell.

Q : Will tech products like Uber and Ola mean a better deal for doctors and patients? How can pharma partner with such players?

This has been a fascinating question and one asked quite often. To elaborate on your analogy – Uber and Ola are aggregator organizations. This means that they use digital technology to bring a cab to a customer. The beauty of the model is that they neither own the cabs, nor are the drivers their employees. In health care, the likes of Practo bring patients to doctors and the likes of Nightingales bring doctors to the patients.

While on the face of it, it seems like a good idea to have a service of bringing additional patients to doctors, this hasn’t really gone well with doctor organizations (who protested their members advertising on a website) or with the govt who cannot get themselves around to regulate these new-age services. To answer your question specifically – any program or company that reduces transaction costs for consumers to seek health care of their choice is definitely a better deal for everyone.

Since pharma still focuses on pushing its pills, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future, I think what it can seek to benefit from these tech players is Big Data. Many of these companies over time will accumulate information on the beliefs and behavior of health consumers. Pharma can glean out great insights from that information. Now whether the tech players will want Pharma to monetize that information or want to do it themselves will be interesting to see.

Q : Is there an increased understanding of digital by Indian Pharma? How do you look at digital adoption by Indian Pharma?

Oh yes of course! Adopting digital channels to engage with doctors has picked up rather well in India as it has around the world. I am aware of some very interesting things that Indian pharma is doing on this front.

When we speak of adopting digital, there are two ways in which I would see it – the first way is to evaluate the use of content across channels. I would be very impressed to see content created and customized for multiple channels. I think this has a lot to do with understanding the functionalities and the scope of each channel and how that helps to promote the chosen story/message.

The second way to view digital adoption would be to see if content across multiple channels carries the same message or storyline. Most often I see messaging created for Twitter being quite different from Facebook which is itself far removed from website banner adverts. It would seem odd to customers if they’re unable to see the same message or connect the dots when they view that content over different channels. This, in my opinion, is quite key to superior engagement of digital technology. Of course all of this stems from the broad strategy for the brand/company.

That said, its great to see marketers finally accept this technology for its scope and power. One must experiment with it to learn how to use it best.

Q : Is there is need for education in digital adoption by way of workshops and what should these workshops focus?

Education is always useful. It helps to know what the industry is doing at large. Of late, I have noticed that fewer pharma managers are skeptical about non-pharma examples and this is a very encouraging trend. Earlier, I would see people rejecting any great example from non-pharma without understanding that the principle is more important than the example. The change means that pharma managers are opening up their minds and this augurs extremely well for the industry.

I don’t think workshops on digital technology would work in isolation. Since technology only adds further scope to engage with doctors and patients, the workshop should examine marketing plans to see if they have really built in the use of technology to optimize results. Ideally this exercise should happen a few weeks before the marketing team begins to work on their brand plans. If they understand the technology available, its functionalities, scope and results it can bring, I am sure marketing managers will understand better how to use it in their work.

Pharma Selling Model must Adapt

Pharma Selling Model must Adapt  (Listen to the audio file (5:03) by clicking on the link)

Worldwide, medical research and health care philosophy is undergoing fundamental shifts. The first is a fundamental and significant shift in healthcare philosophy and medical research – from a world in which we “react” to disease and illness after it has happened, to one in which we will be doing far more in advance to “prevent” specific health care problems. The driver for this massive change is the emergence of extremely specialized and highly personalized medical treatments based upon your own particular DNA.

The second shift (which is because of the first) is that healthcare is now becoming

  1. Predictive – forewarn people of susceptibility to diseases
  2. Preventative – empower them with information and resources to take preventive measures and to keep themselves healthy
  3. Personalized – provide information that is most relevant to them and what they want to know instead of generic and unimaginative information (n=1, R=G)
  4. Participative – make people a part of decisions made about their health. After all, its their lives. Enable them and trust them to hold themselves accountable

The common underlying cause for these two shifts is the advent of technology

These developments raise some interesting questions. Are these changes heralding in rapid change across the pharma industry and causing companies to re-evaluate their sales and marketing strategies? Are the pharma industry’s sales forces, with their current structure and training, capable of leveraging – to their advantage – the impact that the advent of technology has on the way patients seek treatment and on the way doctors treat them?